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 Post subject: AAC Muzzle Brake Installation Question
PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 11:09 pm 
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Silent But Deadly
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I just received my M4-2000 1/2-28 TPI brake, nice piece, I can't wait to shoot it.

I was reading the instructions, yeah I actually read them, and the excerpt below made me curious.

AAC Instructions wrote:
... the ports of the muzzle brake must be oriented at 9 and 3 o-clock. The ideal method of achieving this orientation is to have a depot level armorer machine a stainless steel washer of the proper length that allows the muzzle brake to thread on so that the ports align at 9 and 3 o-clock. ..."


I have a lathe and some machining experience, but how in the hell do you machine a stainless washer that is say 0.035"?

It took 28 lb-ft of torque to perfectly align my brake with a 0.010in shim. Clearly I don't need to turn a custom shim, but I'm curious how it would be done.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 11:18 pm 
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Im thinking PEEL washer .... or .15 or larger shim

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 7:56 pm 
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Glad your brake went on with out a problem!

I will ask the guy that wrote the instruction about that other bit...

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 7:57 pm 
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The way we do it is to simply drill a hole in a piece of barstock and part it off.
It generally takes a pretty ridgid machine to part off and leave a smooth surface finish.

If it needs to be trimmed to size we use whats call emergency collets. This picture pretty well says it all.

Image

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 8:36 pm 
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Silent But Deadly
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Great illustration, how thin of a washer can you make with this method?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 8:42 pm 
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So basically the collet is an expendable part and a one time use?

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2009 1:39 pm 
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The collets locks into a collet chuck which squeezes it, so you'd need to have a 5C collet chuck on your machine. The collets are soft material and can easily be machined for another job. %c Emergency collets are a easy to acquire at auction used.
As far as how small a piece of material, dunno, the smallest I've personally ever held is probably only 0.020 or so. I'm sure you could go smaller than that, but you'd eventually reach a point where the collet would crush the material, that's where you have to switch to a surface or Blanchard grinder.

FYI I didn't do the illustration, it's just off the web.

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Last edited by AAA on Sat Apr 11, 2009 8:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2009 4:33 pm 
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Silent But Deadly
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I got my equipment at an auction, and I have a collet chuck, I've just never used it. I guess it's time to get an emergency collet.

Also, thanks for the lead to www.home-machine-shop.com, interesting site.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2009 6:57 pm 
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I would say a grinder is the best method for this, we have ground some shims on our surface grinder that were .0004", it was a obscure shape and needed ports through the shim so we made the part at .100" thick on a 5 axis and then put it on the grinder and took it down the the .0004" I personally didn't work on it but I know that guy who did it only felt comfortable drilling the ports with a piece of material that was at least a .100". So what I would do would be make over size washer with the correct OD and ID then grind it down to fit.


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